LETTERING + GRAPHIC
DESIGN LEARNING

May 2017

It’s the last Thursday in May, which means it’s time for your free June 2017 desktop wallpapers! I’ve been wanting to play with acrylics a bit more lately, so this month’s wallpaper was an experiment of color mixing and texture. I went with a blue/green/teal palette for Father’s Day this month, keeping a balanced mix of all (without getting too muddy) throughout. Let me know if you’d like a tutorial on how I made the paint texture and I’ll put one together 😉 Once created (and dry), I scanned the artwork into the computer, color adjusted in Photoshop, then added the dates using my font, Miss Magnolia.

The download includes the wallpapers in two common resolutions: 1280x1024px and 1920x1080px, with and without dates. I’ve left the year off of the ‘no-dates’ versions, so you can use it for any June in the future, too!

Happy Tuesday, friends! Today we’re jumping into procreate with some tips on how you can quickly improve your iPad lettering by using the skeleton technique and a mono weight brush. The Skeleton Technique is a trick that, when used, can give your lettering dramatic results fast. We’ll start the tutorial by creating our own mono weight brush by altering a default/standard brush in procreate. Then, I’ll share my process for utilizing the skeleton technique, along with a few examples to get you started. Read on to see how!

I actually stumbled upon this effect while playing around in Photoshop with this Instagram post awhile back. It felt like it needed a little something extra, and after playing around with some settings, I was able to get a watercolor glitter effect I really loved. I had completely forgotten about it, then that instagram post randomly appeared in my pinterest feed the other day. That’s when I knew I had to create a tutorial 🙂 If you’re not ready to use your own watercolor lettering yet, I’ve included another option for achieving the same effect using your favorite fonts. Read on to see it all!

Happy Tuesday! This part of the year is always one of my favorites because it’s all about celebrating moms. My mom and I have always been really close – she was actually born on Mother’s Day the year she was born, and when she had my youngest sister, it was Mother’s Day that year *and* her birthday. Pretty crazy, especially since Mother’s Day doesn’t land on the same day each year. In case life has gotten a little crazy lately and you haven’t picked up a card yet, I’ve got you covered 😉 This week, we’ll create a simple (beginner friendly!) watercolor florals Mother’s Day card in Illustrator using a bouquet from my newest Watercolor Leaves and Florals kit, or you can use the free mini kit I’ve also included below. Read on to see it all!

While browsing pinterest last week, I came across this ‘A’ and I knew I had to recreate it digitally. I loved the way the shadows ‘stair stepped’ the different sides, and how those shadows made the letter feel raised. I also liked the fact that I could integrate a bunch of colors without it seeming too busy, and that I could put my own spin on it with some glitter textures. In this week’s tutorial, I’m sharing my process for creating this layered letter effect, using both Illustrator and Photoshop. You can stay in Illustrator the entire way if you’d like, but I discuss my reasons for hopping into Photoshop to finish things off. Read on to see it all!