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vectorize Tag

If you’ve been here before, you already know I’m crazy about watercolor – traditional or digital. A couple years back, I shared how to vectorize watercolor textures, so today I want to share the process I use to vectorize watercolor lettering. We’ll start by creating our watercolor lettering traditionally using Arteza watercolor brush pens. Next, we’ll scan it into the computer, then finish it up by vectorizing in Illustrator. Read on for the full supply list + tutorial!

After I created this tutorial, I received a few questions about how to create pattern brushes with corners in Illustrator. If you ever need your pattern brush applied to a 90º angle, you’ll need to implement custom corners. Here’s the kicker, though; Illustrator CC makes corners super easy when the pattern brush is geometric. When your pattern brush is hand drawn, there are extra considerations to make, so we’re covering them all in this week’s tutorial. Read on to create hand drawn pattern brushes with corners!

If you love lettering – whether it’s on paper or an iPad, you’re probably familiar with how powerful your lettering becomes when it’s vectorized. Vectorization allows your lettering to be infinitely rescaled without losing quality. This means it can be put on anything, at any size and look as great as the day it was drawn. Since it’s a digital copy, it can exist for forever without fear of it being buried in past stacks of lettering experiments, too. It’s also a crucial step in creating open type fonts!

In this week’s video, I’m sharing my favorite, most reliable Illustrator trace settings when it comes to vectorizing lettering. These are the settings I use every time I vectorize to keep as much original quality as possible. Read on for it all!

One of my favorite uses for the hand lettering I create is vectorizing it and using it digitally. When it’s digital, you don’t just have one copy anymore; you have unlimited copies. Unlimited copies leaves the door to digital and physical prints massively wide open. By taking a few simple steps, you can quickly digitize your lettering, clean it up in Illustrator and create a print ready file in a matter of minutes. Like I said, one of my favorite things 🙂 This week, I share my full process on how I do it by creating a hand lettered birthday card in Illustrator!

One of my favorite things is taking a doodle and reimagining it digitally. If you’ve been here before, you know that’s true! One thing I find myself doing a lot with my mini doodles lately is turning them into seamless pattern brushes so they can connect to make (any length) dividers, laurels – you name it. There’s a little trick to getting them seamless and once you do, they are so much fun to play with. In this week’s tutorial, we’ll take a mini doodle, vectorize it, make it seamless, then convert it into a multi-purpose, seamless pattern brush in Illustrator. Read on to see how easy it is!

Happy Tuesday! This week’s tutorial is brought to you by Whitney + Monica who both emailed asking how to vectorize hand drawn doodles so they would have reuseable, and infinitely rescalable vectors. You’ve probably seen vector artwork around a lot lately – I just released a pack of vectors a few weeks ago and gave 5 of them away for free. In this tutorial, using that vector pack as an example, I share how I took those hand drawn elements from a doodle on a sheet of copy paper to a crisp vector that can be used over and over again on any application. Do you remember the how to vectorize hand lettering tutorial? If you’ve practiced that at all, you’ll be in great shape with converting doodles 🙂 In this video, we’ll go over 3 different methods of cleaning up your doodles, so whether you’re a beginner or advanced Illustrator user, there’s an option that will work for you. Let’s get started!

If you took my Watercolor Branding Skillshare class, you learned how to digitize watercolor textures – from scanning them in, to color adjustments, to removing the background correctly so they could be placed on anything. When a watercolor texture is scanned in, you’re limited by the greatest size and resolution your scanner is able to scan at. For large applications (think billboards, signage, posters), if a professional scanner wasn’t used, resolution is likely too small for the texture to reproduce as crisply as you might wish. Enter vectorized textures. Since vectors (which are point based instead of pixel based) can be rescaled infinitely without losing quality, they make a great alternative to finding a high res scanner and going through the process of color editing + removing the background again. Watercolor textures are super detailed, so finding a happy medium with file size and a similar outcome to the raster (pixel) based image is key when vectorizing. In this tutorial, I share my exact method on how to vectorize watercolor textures using two different textures. We’ll go over what to look for when you vectorize your own.

Happy Tuesday! Chances are you’ve heard of hand lettering recently – it’s everywhere! Many tutorials on hand lettering are paid ones, but I have the best readers, so this one’s free 🙂 In this week’s tutorial, we go over the basics of converting some hand drawn lettering and make it digital by vectorizing it. We’ll take a scan of a hand lettered word, optimize its contrast in Photoshop, then vectorize it in Illustrator. Vectorizing will help us to have our lettering fully scalable, re-colorable, and allows us to digitally customize it without compromising resolution. Let’s get started!

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