HomePosts Tagged "typography" (Page 5)

typography Tag

My newest font, Skinny Jeans, just went live this week! I’ve been making a point to share process info for the fonts I make (here’s Espresso Roast), so that’s what this week is all about šŸ™‚ Skinny Jeans is a font trio that includes the main script style, a caps style that pairs perfectly and a symbols font to add extra personality to layouts. The hand drawn + illustrated symbols also come as a vector file to make things quicker for those who work in Illustrator. This font is by far the most in depth of all I’ve created; it contains 30+ ligatures, alternates and extra features. In the video below, you’ll see what raw materials I used to initially hand letter the font, then the steps I took to make it a fully functioning font. Read on to see everything!

In my online course, Lettering Layouts, we talk about how to pair different styles of lettering and creates beautiful, impactful messages with them. Sometimes it can be tough just coming up with some different lettering ideas, though! To make things a little easier, this week I’m sharing 10 super easy hand lettering enhancements anyone can do. We’ll slowly increase in complexity as we go along, but you’ll see quickly how easy they are to apply. I’ve also included a free pdf of everything we covered below šŸ˜‰ All you need is a pen and/or pencil and some paper, so let’s get lettering!

If you love lettering and watercolors, you’ve probably come across the watercolor galaxy effect. Whether just as a beautiful texture, or incorporated into lettering, it’s eye catching. Made from a variety of cloud-like colorful textures, it’s further detailed with doodled stars. There’s nothing like creating this traditionally with watercolors, but you can achieve this same look in Photoshop. In this tutorial, I take you through my process of creating and applying this watercolor galaxy effect to lettering, all within Photoshop. This is a bit of an advanced tutorial, so we’ll move through things quicker and with less detail than usual since there’s a lot to cover. Let’s dive into this galaxy!

Ever dreamed of creating your own hand lettered font? Actually typing with *your* letterforms? I promise there are fewer better feelings when it comes to loving lettering than that šŸ˜‰ But where do you even begin? How do you create those initial letters so you can convert them into a font? While the topic of how to prepare your lettering for font making is covered extensively in my course, Learn Font Making, I wanted to share a bit of my process in this week’s tutorial. In this video, we’ll talk about how to prepare lettering traditionally (writing utensil + paper) so you get all the characters you need for your font. If you’d prefer to prepare lettering on an iPad instead, that’s covered specifically inside the course. For now, read on for the traditional method!

Whether you’re creating font or lettering styles that go together as a family or creating beautiful layouts with clear hierarchy, pairing type is important. When two styles are too similar to each other, it can cause visual confusion at first glance: what part do you read first? What styles feel most harmonious with each other? What will make my layout look great and communicate well? With a few tips in mind, those decisions can be much easier to make. Read on for my 3 simple tips for pairing type!

A few months ago, I shared how to create a similar effect as this in Photoshop, and I was asked how to also do it in Procreate, so here we are! This week, I’m sharing how to create shadow depth typography using Procreate on an iPad. At first glance, you may think this is just a simple drop shadow, but this drop shadow is much larger and darker than what you can get by implementing it traditionally. It also fully connects to the word it’s attached to, while also extending further than you can get by just sliding a copy of your lettering and blurring it. I also share how to group layers, so you can move more than one item at a time, but still edit layers independently of one another. I promise it’s worth the 5 minutes this week! Read on to see it all šŸ˜‰

One of my favorite typography books is Shadow Type by Steven Heller + Louise Fili. I’ve broken the hardcover spine with all of the times I’ve paged through, sticky noted the tops of others and left it flat open, absorbingĀ as much as possible. What’s most impressive is the consistency and creativity with all of that 3D type, perfectly executed by hand. I’m constantly reminded of how lucky we are to have a program like Adobe Illustrator, makingĀ things inĀ seconds that once took hours. One shadow type project I’ve been working to perfect is dimensional signage typography. I love how the typography looks 3D and oftentimes has a long shadow, extending in the opposite direction. In this week’s tutorial, I’m sharing my method of creating that signage typography look usingĀ Illustrator!

Almost two years ago, I createdĀ some freelance lettering for a ‘spicy’ greeting card company called Get Feisty. One of the styles requested was what I call wave lettering, or lettering that looked like waves from far away. I hadn’t lettered in that layout style before, but it was a fun challenge figuring out my process for it. After a few (or 20+) tries, I hadĀ a solid process and it has become one of my favorite layout styles. In this week’s video, I’m sharing the exact process I use toĀ create wave lettering. Read on for the simple materials and full video below!

A few weeks ago, I shared how to create this effect using an iPad with Procreate. This week, I wanted to share how easy it is to create typographic floating shadows in Adobe Illustrator, too! The method I use utilizes the blend tool and pathfinder palette and a few simple steps. This effect is perfect for headlines, special art projects or even signage. Read on to see it in action!

Happy Thursday, friends! Earlier this week (on Tuesday, as fate would have it), my youtube channel hit 100,000 subscribers, so I wanted to make it extra special by celebrating with a free font!

I’ve been posting a new tutorial/video every single Tuesday for nearly three years now. Your support over that time – whether you are a new follower or have been along for the full ride, has meant more to me than I can possibly express. Each tutorial takes a minimum ofĀ 4-6 hours to complete. From concept, to figuring out the best possible process for it (*making it before teaching it* time), recording, editing, tagging, uploading, writing the accompanying blog post, creating images and announcing it on various social channels. It’s a labor of love I’m happy to continueĀ each week because of all of you.

To celebrate properly, today I’m giving away my new font, Corner Bakery, which isĀ all yours to pick up below šŸ™‚

This week, I thought I’d go completely analog with a DIY watercolor ribbon Father’s Day card. I love taking handmade creations digital, but every now and then – especially for sentimental holidays, you can’t really beat 100% handmade šŸ˜‰ With Father’s Day coming in less than a week, you’ll still have time to seal this in an envelope, stamp it up and get it in a mailbox in time. So, let’s get this card going; all the instructions, materials and full video are below!

Happy Tuesday, friends! Today we’re jumping into procreate with some tips on how you can quickly improve your iPad lettering by using the skeleton technique and a mono weight brush. The Skeleton Technique is a trick that,Ā when used, can give your lettering dramatic resultsĀ fast. We’ll start the tutorial by creating our own mono weight brush by altering a default/standard brush in procreate. Then, I’ll share my process for utilizing the skeleton technique, along with a few examples to get you started. Read on to see how!

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